Mothers Who Murder Their Children

Mothers murder their children for many reasons, which typically fall into one of three classes: accidental, purposeful, and abuse-related filicide. Research points to differences between maternal behavioral characteristics when committing neonaticide and filicide.

  • neonaticide (children less than 24 hours old). Limited statistics exists for neonaticides, since many go unreported. The majority of the mothers are young and unmarried. Their self-image appears to be important and the homicides result to save face and social status.
  • infanticide (children less than one year old) There is a clear distinction between mothers who commit neonaticide vs infanticide. Michelle Oberman, law professor/author suggests reviewing societal norms which may be causing undo stress to mothers or harm to children. Infanticide is not random and is not committed by only the mentally ill.
  • filicide (children 18 years and younger). The U.S. statistics are the highest for infanticide followed by pre-school and school-age children. 30%-45% percent of parents committing filicide commit suicide.

The following are 5 recurring motives for maternal filicide based on Phillip Resnick’s worldwide review of psychiatric research: (Altruistic)-These mothers feel they are protecting their children from worse harm. (Psychotic)-Psychotic or delirious mothers have no motive other than reacting to hallucinations. (Fatal maltreatment)-These mothers’ intentions are usually not homicide, but residual effects of years of abuse and neglect or Munchausen syndrome by proxy are often culprits. (Unwanted child)-The child is seen as a hindrance or burden. Lastly, (Spouse revenge)-Although rare, the mother kills the child to torture the child’s father or seek revenge.

The following podcast was taped by death investigator Darren Dake of Coroner Talk™ with myself, discussing the psychology of mom’s who kill.

 

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5 Behaviors to Improve Brain Plasticity

Are you a creature of habit? I am not referring to toilet paper brands. If your closest acquaintances can predict your daily routine, then it is time for some mind limbering.

  1. Break habits, rearrange daily tasks, and create new routines.
  2. Update your mind’s playbook.  Revisit your schema and update your outlook, a.k.a. your book of rules.
  3. Now for the workout…engage your prefrontal cortex.  Participate in new activities, not in your daily routine.
  4. Recognize and accept all of your emotions.  Ride the roller coaster!  According to a Duke University study, denying one’s emotions is a culprit for addictive behaviors.
  5. Change your focus throughout the day.  Allow your mind time to relax and your emotions change.

Mind limbering is stimulating. Go ahead, create some new neural pathways and feel the difference!

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