Real Estate Tip #3 – Marketing with P.I.E.

“…believe in your message; make your words smile!”

How-to’s and self-help videos and blogs flood the internet, so why read this one? I am Southern born and bred, a lady who understands that pie is to first impressions like tea is to problem-solving. Continue reading “Real Estate Tip #3 – Marketing with P.I.E.”

Sales Tip #2 – Supercharge Your Brain

A career in sales requires high energy, along with logic, imagination and passion. I refer to the later as L.I.P. service! Your perception of opportunities and potential clients fuels your ability to think logically and creatively during any sales process.

Regardless of your daily sales routine, focus on supercharging your brain. Any deficit in your cognitive abilities will affect your sales numbers; that’s a “no brainer”. However, more importantly, a perception problem may cause a processing problem, which can lead to a sales slump and eventually an empty pipeline!

Supercharging your brain is a continuous process. The brain responds to activity AND lack of activity. Our brains are plastic; they adapt to our needs and repetitive activities. Therefore, you CAN teach an old dog new tricks!

Physical and mental exercise bathes the brain in glucose (sugar), which promotes neural connections. Neurons that fire together, wire together. Concentrating on changing the brain’s firing patterns results in changes in logic, imagination, and passion (L.I.P.). Repeated actions (daily sales calls, website updates, and social media entries) and repeated thoughts (visualizing goals, positive mindset, and understanding customer needs) initiate a driving mental force, along with feeding neural pathways and triggering firing patterns.

A supercharged brain stores actions as memories and scripts in the subconscious mind. With repetition, the brain hard-wires the memories in the unconscious mind. Less energy is then needed for daily sales tasks, leaving more brain power to think creatively and sell with passion!

~ Dr. Doscher

Getting the Most Mileage from Your Mental Fuel

Years ago, I heard the metaphor, mental fuel, used to refer to attention. I found it appropriate because like gas tanks, our cognitive thought processes hold a limited amount of fuel, and we can determine how quickly we use the fuel, depending on our driving habits. Research has proven that

  • we can determine which mental tasks receive the most fuel (attention)
  • rehearsed or learned tasks will require less fuel resources (attention).

Research has not confirmed, although highly speculative, multiple tasks can be performed in parallel versus flipping back-and-forth between tasks, and some tasks require a consistent amount of attention, regardless of the situation or other tasks involved (Willingham, 2007).

What about driving and talking? The question remains does our attention flip flop, yet go unnoticed, especially with experienced drivers? Probably so, since the experienced driver may not be giving 100% of their attention to either task. Don’t forget, memory also plays a part. We have practiced certain scripts to the point they no longer present much cognitive load (mental strain).

Research in the mid-1990’s demonstrated that auditory and visual tasks were interlinked and that one could not be compromised without affecting the other. Nevertheless, it was found that two auditory tasks caused more interference than an auditory and visual task. Perhaps, this helps explain why we can drive down a familiar road and chat with a friend, but incessantly get frustrated when talking on the phone, while someone is asking questions in our other ear! Remember, differences attract, and likenesses repel, or at least for attention mileage.

~ Dr. Michelle Doscher

For more information on cognitive processes, check out Daniel Willingham, along with Willingham, D. B. (2001). Cognition: The thinking animal. New York: Prentice Hall. 2nd edition (2004). 3rd edition (2007).

How Does Color Affect Our Mood?

Companies around the world research the best colors for their logos. Google tested 40 shades of blue before deciding which blue to use in their logo. The psychology of color plays a role in most of these decisions, such as red signifies warmth, passion, and sales! Blue is calming and trustworthy, while green signifies health. Chanel, coined “the little black dress” and continues to use black in their logo symbolizing classic and sophisticated designs.

We see images via the visual cortex portion of the brain. However, the retinal ganglion cells are the first responder neurons, sending signals to the hypothalamus, part of our brain’s limbic system. The hypothalamus helps maintain balance with our body’s internal environment (hunger, thirst, temperature, and sleep). It also triggers secretion of hormones that affect our mood, emotions, and need for reward. Here lies the key to how different wavelengths of color affect our mood.

Blue/green wavelengths, such as in morning light stimulate the hormone cortisol, which stimulates us to awaken. Therefore, it is hard to go to sleep after working on the computer for hours, unless you wear blue blocking glasses, such as EyeYee. I discovered this secret after experiencing many sleepless nights and eye strain while writing my dissertation. Keep in mind, too much cortisol released in our body causes stress and anxiety. (Could that be the reason why people tend to be more anxious after hours of computer gaming? Don’t go there! LOL.) Whereas, soft oranges/yellows in sunsets encourage melatonin production and help keep our sleep cycles on schedule; that why I recommend using warm lights in the bedroom to encourage restful sleep.

One Tokyo railway line installed blue lights at the end of their platforms and claimed they had a 74% reduction in suicide at these platforms. However, Nicholas Ciccone, PhD found inconclusive evidence regarding the effects of blue light on impulsivity. Correlations can be a bit misleading, but they do sell headlines! Two of the world’s largest restaurant food chains rely on color science for their marketing. McDonald’s has maintained their golden arches and red accents, while Subway adds a pop of yellow and green. Volkswagen maintains their image as “the car of the people” while encourage trustworthiness with the blue background in their logo.

As a researcher in interpersonal communications, I would love to hear your feedback regarding your choice of colors for clothes and possible effects on conversation.

Best to you all,

Dr. Michelle Doscher

Real Estate Tip #1: The Science of Showing Property

Most clients want to see multiple properties, despite forgetting the minute details of one property when going to the next. So, should you only show two or three properties? Preferably not, unless requested by your client.

Science is your friend; remember these statistics and become a top-selling agent!

Your client will remember…

90% of what they saw when they walk through the property with a listing sheet.
50% of what they saw when they discuss the details with someone.
30% of what they saw when you only show the listing on a website or listing sheet.
10% of what they learn when they’ve learned from reading an ad.
5% of what they learn when they’ve learned from listening to you!

Prior to showing property, email your clients the listing sheets and links to property websites of the properties they want to see, in addition to others similar in price, structure, and location. On the day of showings, have extra copies of the listing sheets when showing each property. Next, spend a few minutes discussing each property after viewing. Take the time to take notes on the listing sheets and encourage your client to do the same. After viewing all the preferred listings for that day, spend some time recapping the highlights of each listing.  This simple but effective process allows the brain to retrieve, process and encode information for easier recall.

So, what about order?  Group the properties and rank them according to your client’s needs and wants in a property.  The first few properties will be memorable because of the Primacy Effect and the last property will be most memorable due to the Recency Effect. Unfortunately, the middle listings will suffer the Intermediate Effect and possibly be lost in the shuffle, especially regarding specific details.  Obviously, your rankings will be based on your client’s feedback prior to showing the listings. By grouping properties, you can tweak the order of showings if necessary, based on your client’s most recent feedback during the showings.

The technique is simple. Show and tell them what you are going to show them. Show them what you told them you were going to show them. Lastly, Tell them again what you just showed them.  Sound familiar? Why reinvent the wheel, this memory technique has been around for ages?  Happy house hunting!

~ Michelle Doscher, PhD