Our Brain and ‘Wireless’ Neural Connections

 

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We use the term wireless to reference cellular communication pathways around the world. Our brains’ neural pathways are similar, including synapses, also known as chemical bridges, for which neural impulses travel. While recently studying sections of brain tissue from the hippocampus of mice, scientists discovered impulses traversing across gaps void of brain tissue or neurotransmitters. Could we possibly have our own natural wireless network in our brains?

Hippocampus

The hippocampus is responsible for memory consolidation and spatial memory. This amazing part of our brain converts short-term memories to  long-term memories. Not only is it responsible for us remembering our home address but also spatial relationships in everyday life. According to researchers, the hippocampus  apparently is working overtime during our sleep.

Slower periodic brain waves occur while we sleep, yet neural connections and rewiring of trillions of nerve cells also take place. This type of brain activity, including wireless connections, were noted in the hippocampus tissue of mice. Is there a possible correlation between slower brain waves and wireless neural connections? Maybe.

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My personal takeaway and food for thought is perhaps we should take a closer look at mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy. I am the most productive when I am relaxed. No wonder I occasionally wake up while sleeping with a fantastic ah-ha moment. How about you?

What if brain scientists are on the verge of discovering the mystery to accessing more of our brain’s processing capabilities, via wireless connections? Just in case, read on for a healthy mind-body exercise.

Mindfulness

Try this mindfulness technique to place yourself in a more relaxed state and slow down your brain waves. Imagine the clutter of today’s stresses as individually labeled envelopes. See yourself categorizing these labeled envelopes into large boxes, labeled as: Facts, Guesses, Judgements, Past Activities, Present Activities, and Possibilities.

Focus on the context of your thoughts and not the content. By categorizing and organizing your thoughts, you can go through your ‘files’ at your leisure. Don’t allow your mind to inundate you with high priority, high stress content. Remember, our brains combine snippets of information that are not necessarily accurate on all accounts. So, “choose wisely.”

Best,

Dr. Doscher

 

 

Author: Michelle Doscher, PhD

I use verbal and nonverbal behavioral cues to investigate the psychology fueling sales, marketing, and interpersonal communication. My analyses answer the "why?" questions needed to close deals and augment inquiries.

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